News / Pregnancy Outcomes in Obese Women Better With Induced Labor
15 December, 2017

 

Pregnancy Outcomes in Obese Women Better With Induced Labor

 

 

 

 

For obese pregnant women, elective induction of labor at 39 to 41 weeks of gestation may be a better choice than expectant management.

Compared with expectant management, induced labor at 39 to 41 weeks of gestation was associated with a lower risk for cesarean delivery and severe maternal or neonatal morbidity, with no change in the odds of infant and neonatal mortality.  At 41 weeks, it was also associated with "reduced odds of some neonatal complications."

Maternal obesity, defined as a prepregnancy body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or more, has been associated with an increased risk for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, such as preeclampsia, shoulder dystocia, brachial plexus injury, and stillbirth, compared with findings in nonobese women.

 

The incidence of all of these outcomes increases with advancing gestational age, so it is plausible that elective induction of labor and earlier delivery might prevent their occurrence.

 

 

source: Medscape

Paul barakat

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